AMSI Public Lecture: The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets

The Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute (AMSI) is pleased to announce a free public lecture by Simon Singh.

Simon Singh 

 

 

Simon Singh, best-selling author of ‘Fermat’s Last Theorem‘ and ‘The Code Book‘, will discuss his latest book ‘The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets‘. He will explain how a team of mathematically gifted writers have covered everything from calculus to geometry, from pi to game theory, and from infinitesimals to infinity in various episodes of The Simpsons. Simon will also discuss how the writers of Futurama have similarly made it their mission to smuggle deep mathematical ideas into the series.

Visit Simon’s website or follow him on Twitter  

 

EVENT DETAILS | BOOK YOUR SEAT | HOW TO GET THERE  
MORE ABOUT THE SIMPSONS AND THEIR MATHEMATICAL SECRETS 

 

Event details

Date: Tuesday 21st January 2014

Time: 6:45pm start (doors open at 6:30pm), 1-hour lecture

Venue: The University of Melbourne, Elisabeth Murdoch Building (Theatre A)

Map: http://maps.unimelb.edu.au/parkville/building/134#.UtXL7va6n8B 

Book your seat 

Click here to register via Eventbrite

How to get there:

Entry to the lecture theatre is located opposite Castro’s Kiosk

From Swanston Street, walk along the narrow walkway past the Ian Potter café. The lecture theatre will be on your left.

Public transport is recommended as car parking in the surrounding area can be limited. The closest tram stop is Stop 1 on Swanston Street.

The University offers parking for a fee. Please visit http://www.pcs.unimelb.edu.au/traffic-and-parking/casual_parking.html for details.

The Simpsons and their Mathematical Secrets 

"Simon Singh's excellent book blows the lid off a decades-long conspiracy to secretly educate cartoon viewers"
- David X. Cohen, writer for The Simpsons and Futurama 

The brainy new book by the bestselling author of Fermat's Last Theorem - a must for anyone interested in mathematics as well as for the millions of Simpsons fans worldwide. 

The Simpsons is probably the most successful show in television history, with 27 prime time Emmy Awards. But most people don't know that The Simpsons writing team is bristling with Maths PhDs, and the series contains enough mathematics to form a university course - and then some. That's even before you tune in to its wicked younger sister, Futurama.

Simon Singh, ex-CERN physicist and No.1 bestselling author of Fermat's Last Theorem and the author of two other international bestsellers, lifts the lid on this hidden maths in The Simpsons and their Mathematical Secrets. 

Using episodes like "Bart the Genius" and "Homer3" as jumping-off points, Singh brings to life the most intriguing and meaningful mathematical concepts, from the very origins of numbers to one of the most profound outstanding problems that today's mathematicians are tackling: the norotious P v NP problem. In between, you can learn about Homer's Last Theorem, read a digestible history of Apu's favourite number, Π, and meet some great mathematicians of the past. 

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