Workshop on Experimental & Analytical Mathematics

The workshop marks the occasion of Jonathan Borwein's 60th birthday

AMSI Careers Evening (Victoria)

Recent mathematics and statistics graduates spoke about their current work and careers so far to over 150 students at the 2011 AMSI Careers Evening.

Top tips from the evening:

- align you career with your interests
- choose subjects that broaden your expertise - a little programming goes a long way
- use schemes such as AMSI Intern, AMSI Vacation Research Scholarships, AMSI Summer School, etc to broaden your experience and add depth to your CV (see: www.amsi.org.au)
- think about what skills employers are looking for when selecting your subjects
- have a clear CV appropriate to the jobs you are applying for
- think about what companies are looking for when you submit your application
- use employment agencies to market your skills
and most importantly, as Chris pointed out, remember that maths is the expensive tool that will last you for life!
Speakers:
See more photos of the event on our facebook page
What students said about the event:
"Some very entertaining lecturers - especially David, very passionate people from all different careers who gave very insightful presentations and really enlightened me on the different prospects of where mathematics can take me."

"It's good to know what subjects are right for a career in maths and stats."

"You have interesting and inspiring speakers. Thank you for the event."

Date: Thursday 25 August 2011
Venue: JH Michell Theatre, Richard Berry Building (map)

This annual event is hosted by AMSI and is sponsored by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Melbourne.

AMSI Public Lecture: Professor Danny Calegari

This event is free and open to the public.

Date: Tuesday 19 July
Time: 18:00-19:00
Location: JH Michell Theatre, Richard Berry Building, University of Melbourne

Professor Danny Calegari is the Richard Merkin Professor of Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology, and is one of the recipients of the 2009 Clay Research Award for his work in geometric topology and geometric group theory.

The shape of the internet

Thinking is done by humans, and human brains are good at some things and not others. Because of our highly developed spatial awareness, we are good at thinking geometrically - in fact "to perceive" is literally "to see". Mathematics lets us translate abstract networks of relations - for example, the links between webpages - into geometry; and this opens the door to quantification and analysis. In this talk I will try to explain some of the tools mathematicians use to accomplish this translation, and discuss a few examples.

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The lecture is part of Hyamfest: Geometry & Topology Down Under in honour of Hyam Rubinstein.

AMSI-Mahler Public Lecture: Peter Sarnak

Professor Peter Sarnak
Princeton

Photos of the lecture

Date: Monday 15 August
Time: 18:00-19:00
Location: Laby Theatre, David Caro Building, University of Melbourne (map)

Professor Sarnak is a major figure in modern analytic number theory, with research interests also in analysis and mathematical physics. He has received many awards for his research including the Polya prize in 1998, the Ostrowski prize in 2001, the Conant prize in 2003 and the Cole prize in 2005.

Randomness in Number Theory

By way of concrete examples we discuss the dichotomy that in number theory the basic phenomena are either very structured or if not then they are random. The models for randomness for different problems can be quite unexpected and understanding, and establishing the randomness is often the key issue. Conversely the fact that certain number-theoretic quantities behave randomly is a powerful source for the construction of much sought-after pseudo-random objects.

The lecture is part of the biannual Mahler Lecture tour.

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click image to see photos from the lecture.

 

The third Early Career Workshop of the Australian Mathematical Society

Research presentations by leading ECRs and on various aspects of mathematical careers in academia and industry.